Tag Archives: art

Max Hattler – Divisional Articulations: Wins Grand Prize Award at Supernova Festival

Max Hattler’s new film Divisional Articulations just won the Grand Prize Award at Supernova Festival and the Award for Best Experimental Film at ReAnima Festival Norway.

Supernova describes Divisional Articulations as:

An energetic, thoroughly captivating abstraction… an example of outstanding collaboration in new-media animation and art…

Divisional Articulations is a super trippy audiovisual collaboration between Max Hattler and composer Lux Prima. Repetitions and distortions of synths and bass, squares and circles create an electronic feedback loop that spawns endless arrays of divisional articulations in time and space.

The award-winning piece recently screened at Ars Electronica, and was shortlisted for the Lumen Prize Moving Image Award. It was created with a group of 16 students at the School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong.

Director: Max Hattler
Music: Lux Prima
Animation: King Lam Chan, Po Yi Chan, Hinyi Cheuk, Ka Man Chow, Cheuk Hei Kai, Tsz Ching Kwan, Hau Ying Lui, Ka Man Luk, Ngai Wan Ma, Cheuk Lam Mui, Kam Ian Sio, Susan Sun, Qi Yu Teo, Ka Yiu Wong, Crystal Yip, Ka Man Yu, Max Hattler
Code: Sune Petersen

Artist Interview: Graphik H / H1987 (Hédi Benyounes)

Hédi Benyounes is a French illustrator and musician. He creates graphics under the name Graphik H. Drawing anything from cool celebrity portraits to surreal tattoo themed portraits. You can see other illustrations of his on Tumblr and Instagram.

Hédi Benyounes Illustrations

Hédi also creates music under the name H1987. You can download a free album on his Bandcamp and check out even more music on his Soundcloud. After watching his video for ALASKA we got to talking about the creative process behind his artwork.

Q. Skateboarding seems to be a theme in the ALASKA video, do you skateboard? What do you do for fun?

I love skateboarding. I did a few years when I was younger, but today I draw and create music.

Q. How do you describe your process when it comes to rotoscoping? Do you film? Do you have a favourite software? Where do you get your inspiration?

For the ALASKA video, I used images found on the internet and worked in photoshop drawing image by image.

On the other hand for my COLOR video, I used a process where I drew on sheets and scanned them.

Q. In your music your drums sound like a cool mix of synthetic and acoustic sounds but still played, do you play drums? The MPC? What’s your favourite way to make beats?

For my music, I do everything by computer. I do not play any instrument. I use sampling a lot. I mix the samples with my own compositions so that neither one nor the other is recognized.

Q. When I listen to your old beats and work my way up to H1987 – ALASKA, it seems like the progression is from direct beats to a more sparse and ambient style. What are your musical influences? What are you listening to now?

Indeed, I have been composing music since 2005 and there has been an evolution towards some more atmospheric things. I listen to more and more composers like Philip Glass who inspires me a lot. I listen to a lot of different things depending on my mood. I like to discover new music every day so I search in the old songs and the new ones. I do not really have a definitive playlist.

To find out more about what fuels Graphik H / H1987 – Hédi Benyounes creativity, I asked if he would share a few things he personally found inspiring.

For capturing the motion of skateboarding Hédi mentioned this Rodney Mullens video.

For drawing and animation style, Hédi suggests this Morgan Gruer – Reflections video, a short 2d animated film composed of approximately 1,100 individual drawings.

And for music have a listen to pianist and composer Philip Glass play his piece Mad Rush.

Create a Video Synthesizer with VSynth & Max MSP

VSynth is described as a series of modules built around Gen that together make a modular video synthesizer. With a Beap/Vizzie feel, Vsynth introduces video synthesis and image processing with the efficiency of hardware-accelerated processes.

In order to get started using these exciting new features, we need to install the VSynth package from the package manager in Max MSP. You’ll also need the Syphon package from the package manager. The package manager can be found at File/Show Package Manager within Max MSP.

When you’re done with installing you’re ready to start exploring VSynth:

  • Create a new patcher file
  • Right-click and select Paste From/Vsynth/vsynth_menu.maxpat

This new menu will allow us to create the other modules needed. Anytime you need to create a new vsynth object you just go into locked mode, CMD+E, and select the new modules you need from the VS Modules drop downs.

vsynth_example_03

So in locked mode from the VS Modules create:

  • Global/render
  • Global/sync
  • Generators/wfg_shapes
  • Generators/radial_wfg
  • Processors/clrizer
  • I/O/output

Now unlock your patcher and position your modules so they aren’t stacked on top of each other, then wire them in the following order.

  • Output of your sync generator to the input of your radial_wfg
  • Output of your wfg_shapes to the 2nd input of your radial_wfg
  • Output of your radial_wfg to the input of your clrizer
  • Output of your clrizer to the input of your output

Now lock your patcher and click the X on render. Turn your horizontal master fader all the way up and you should see something like this.

vsynth_example_01

To make this more interesting what we can do is:

  • Lock your patch then create a Processor/mixer_feedback
  • Unlock your patch, select everything connected from the sync generator to the clrizer and duplicate it twice
  • Plug all three clrizer outputs into the inputs of the new mixer, and the output of the mixer into the output
  • Now lock your patch, adjust the mixer levels and feedback to your liking and play with the sync modes on the sync generators

You should get some pretty interesting results. Here’s what I came up with below.

vsynth_example_02

From here you can get even more experimental and add effects to your video synthesizer. For instance I added a couple of rota, a rgb offset and a frame delay to come up with this.

vsynth_example_04

You’ll likely want to create a video of what you have done so far. To do that:

  • Lock your patcher and create a I/O/syphon from the VS modules
  • Unlock and connect your video output to the syphon input, similar to how you have it hooked to the output

This next part requires a bit of extra software, if you’re on a mac it’s called syphon video recorder (I think windows uses spout). With syphon video recorder it is easy. Make sure you have your syphon set up in Max MSP like so with something playing.

vsynth_example_06

Then switch over to syphon and select your video source in the left most drop down. In our case it’s the Vsynth or Max.

vsynth_example_07

Then click record and go mess around with your video. Now you can capture your own super cool effects, have fun!

Ben Ridgeway’s – Stillpoint

Ben Ridgeway is an associate professor at Stanford University who creates digital art, animation and sculptures that explore turning the metaphysical side of reality into tangible forms. Ben describes his work as something that “often focuses on dreams, visions, hypnogogic imagery, the concept of infinity, and the ephemeral nature of existence”.

Recently I came across his Stillpoint video and have to say he executes quite well on these concepts. Upon visiting Ben’s vimeo page I was delighted to see he had other videos that are equally as impressive. Inner space artifacts really caught my attention, and it was great to see that he has a video up explaining some of the method behind his process.

You can see more work by Ben Ridgeway through visiting his website and his instagram, or follow him on twitter to keep up to date on his latest creations.